Trump: I’ll ‘work so hard’ as president

Donald Trump on Thursday promised change he said America hasn’t seen in decades, as he spoke in front of a crowd of thousands in Washington, D.C., on his final day as president-elect.

“I promise you that I will work so hard. We’re gonna get it turned around,” Trump told supporters, pledging to bring back American jobs, build up the military and strengthen the nation’s borders. “We’re going to do things that haven’t been done for our country for many, many decades. It’s going to change. I promise you. It’s going to change.”

Trump spoke for a little more than six minutes Thursday night at the Lincoln Memorial, echoing much of his campaign rhetoric: He hailed his campaign as a “movement” that’s never been seen before, recounted how it started in June 2015, rattled off estimates of the massive crowd sizes from his past rallies, reminded supporters that this is their movement and that he’s merely the messenger, and vowed to unify the country.

He thanked the performers at his “Make America Great Again” welcome celebration and his family for their support, and said his transition team had the idea to host a concert at the Lincoln Memorial, which he suggested may never have occurred before. In fact, President Barack Obama held his inauguration concert in 2009 at the Lincoln Memorial.

“So many people have poured into Washington, D.C. This started out tonight being a small little concert, and then we had the idea, ‘Maybe we’ll do it in front of the Lincoln Memorial,’” Trump said. “I don’t know if it’s ever been done before, but if it has, very seldom. And the people came by the thousands and the thousands, and here we are tonight, all the way back.”

Trump arrived at the Lincoln Memorial with much fanfare, drawing chants of “Trump!” from the thousands of supporters before The Frontmen of Country — Tim Rushlow, Larry Stewart and Richie McDonald — performed a medley of their greatest hits, including Trump’s campaign song, “God Bless the USA,” with Lee Greenwood.

Trump delivered his remarks at his welcome celebration, the final official event on the eve of his inauguration, shortly after 6 p.m. He seemed to enjoy himself, often rocking his head and swaying from side to side with the music. The concert featured country singer Toby Keith, rock band 3 Doors Down and actor Jon Voight, among others.

“This is some day,” Voight told the crowd. He cast Trump as America’s savior, the answer to all Americans’ prayers and the victor of a grueling slog of a campaign despite, he said, “a barrage of propaganda that left us all breathless with anticipation, not knowing if God could reverse all the negative lies against Mr. Trump, whose only desire was to make America great again.”

Voight added that Trump “certainly didn’t need this job” but contended that “God answered all of our prayers. Because here it is: We will be part of history. All of us. President Lincoln, who sits here with us, I’m sure is smiling, knowing America will be saved by an honest and good man who will work for all the people, no matter their creed or color.”

Trump and his family landed at Joint Base Andrews on Thursday afternoon on a Boeing 757, the president-elect’s first ride in a military aircraft. He spoke briefly inside the presidential ballroom of his new Washington hotel at what was billed as a leadership luncheon.

Trump arrived at the Lincoln Memorial with much fanfare, drawing chants of “Trump!” from the thousands of supporters before The Frontmen of Country — Tim Rushlow, Larry Stewart and Richie McDonald — performed a medley of their greatest hits, including Trump’s campaign song, “God Bless the USA,” with Lee Greenwood.

Trump delivered his remarks at his welcome celebration, the final official event on the eve of his inauguration, shortly after 6 p.m. He seemed to enjoy himself, often rocking his head and swaying from side to side with the music. The concert featured country singer Toby Keith, rock band 3 Doors Down and actor Jon Voight, among others.

“This is some day,” Voight told the crowd. He cast Trump as America’s savior, the answer to all Americans’ prayers and the victor of a grueling slog of a campaign despite, he said, “a barrage of propaganda that left us all breathless with anticipation, not knowing if God could reverse all the negative lies against Mr. Trump, whose only desire was to make America great again.”

Voight added that Trump “certainly didn’t need this job” but contended that “God answered all of our prayers. Because here it is: We will be part of history. All of us. President Lincoln, who sits here with us, I’m sure is smiling, knowing America will be saved by an honest and good man who will work for all the people, no matter their creed or color.”

Trump and his family landed at Joint Base Andrews on Thursday afternoon on a Boeing 757, the president-elect’s first ride in a military aircraft. He spoke briefly inside the presidential ballroom of his new Washington hotel at what was billed as a leadership luncheon.

Incoming White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters Thursday morning that Trump “continues to make edits and additions” to the speech, which he said will “be a very personal and sincere statement about his vision for the country” but will also include what it means to be American and what challenges the nation faces.

“I think it’s going to be less of an agenda and more of a philosophical document, a vision of where he sees the country, the proper role of government, the role of citizens,” Spicer said.

Trump shrugged off the forecast of showers that could literally rain on his parade — and his swearing-in, for that matter — at his welcome rally, telling supporters he’ll see them Friday rain or shine.

“I don’t care, frankly, if it’s going to be beautiful or if it’s gonna rain like crazy. Makes no difference to me,” he said. “I have a feeling it’s going to be beautiful. But I will see you tomorrow.”

With the backing of his supporters, Trump pledged to fulfill his campaign mantra and “Make America great again” — “and I’ll add, greater than ever before,” he told the crowd. He wrapped his remarks with a fitting description of what was to come, both as he exited the stage and as the political outsider takes over the federal government. “Thank you very much,” he said, “and enjoy the fireworks.”

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(Source:www.politico.com)
Photo:AP Photo/David J. Phillip

 

All Of The Votes Have Finally Been Counted, Donald Trump Has Just Made Election History

Donald Trump has just officially won the great state of Michigan, making him the first to do so since George H. W. Bush in 1988 (that’s almost 30 years—this truly was a historic election).

This election saw the tightest race in Michigan’s electoral history. Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton by a total of 10,704 votes. This news comes after all 83 counties within the state finally had official verification from voting clerks’ offices.

The end result is a huge 306 electoral votes for Trump, and a measly 232 for Hillary (the worst the Democratic Party has done in decades).

The Michigan Secretary of State made an official statement regarding the entire process:

“Many people have asked about Michigan’s process for counting ballots and certifying election results. Please be aware that all 1,521 Michigan cities and townships completed ballot counting and reported unofficial results by the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 9.”

It’s clear that Trump’s success in many “Democratically-favored” areas came down to his promises to restore industrial vitality and create massive amounts of jobs.

In the midst of this great victory though, Jill Stein has initiated a full legal recount (with the funding of George Soros). Currently, no one is quite sure what will happen next. All that is certain, is that Trump won the election fair and square. If anything happens to change the outcome now, we will all witness the end of Democracy in the free world.

It is a great day for Trump in Michigan, but now the real race begins: can we make it to January 20th?

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(Source:conservativedailypost.com/Alex Cooper)
Photo:huffingtonpost.com

Donald Trump’s Commerce Secretary Is Wilbur Ross

The President-elect is adding the billionaire investor to his cabinet, according to an official.

Wilbur Ross, the billionaire investor considered the “king of bankruptcy” for buying beaten-down companies with the potential to deliver profits, is President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for Commerce secretary, a senior transition official said.

The official isn’t authorized to publicly discuss the matter and requested anonymity.

Reputed by Forbes to be worth nearly $3 billion, Ross would represent the interests of U.S. businesses domestically and abroad as the head at Commerce. His department would be among those tasked with carrying out the Trump administration’s stated goal of protecting U.S. workers and challenging decades of globalization that largely benefited multinational corporations.

With a Florida home down the road from Trump’s Mar-a-Lago retreat, the 78-year-old Ross played a role in crafting and selling the president-elect’s tax-cut and infrastructure plans. Ross has suggested that much of America is disgruntled because the economy has left middle-class workers behind and says Trump represents a shift to a “less politically correct direction.”

“Part of the reason why I’m supporting Trump is that I think we need a more radical, new approach to government— at least in the U.S. — from what we’ve had before,” Ross told CNBC in June, referring to Trump’s blunt tone and sweeping promises to reinvigorate economic growth.

The President-elect is adding the billionaire investor to his cabinet, according to an official.

Wilbur Ross, the billionaire investor considered the “king of bankruptcy” for buying beaten-down companies with the potential to deliver profits, is President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for Commerce secretary, a senior transition official said.

The official isn’t authorized to publicly discuss the matter and requested anonymity.

Reputed by Forbes to be worth nearly $3 billion, Ross would represent the interests of U.S. businesses domestically and abroad as the head at Commerce. His department would be among those tasked with carrying out the Trump administration’s stated goal of protecting U.S. workers and challenging decades of globalization that largely benefited multinational corporations.

With a Florida home down the road from Trump’s Mar-a-Lago retreat, the 78-year-old Ross played a role in crafting and selling the president-elect’s tax-cut and infrastructure plans. Ross has suggested that much of America is disgruntled because the economy has left middle-class workers behind and says Trump represents a shift to a “less politically correct direction.”

“Part of the reason why I’m supporting Trump is that I think we need a more radical, new approach to government— at least in the U.S. — from what we’ve had before,” Ross told CNBC in June, referring to Trump’s blunt tone and sweeping promises to reinvigorate economic growth.

Despite his embrace of populist rhetoric, Ross has enjoyed a patrician lifestyle. He frequently commutes between his offices in New York and home in Palm Beach, Florida, according to Haute Living magazine. He maintains an art collection worth more than $100 million that includes works by the Belgian surrealist Rene Magritte. A graduate of Yale University, he pledged a $10 million to help build its management school.

For 24 years as a banker at Rothschild, Ross developed a lucrative specialty in bankruptcy and corporate restructurings. He founded his own firm, W.L. Ross, in 2000 and earned part of his fortune from investing in troubled factories in the industrial Midwest and in some instances generating profits by limiting worker benefits. That region swung hard for Trump in the election on the promise of more manufacturing jobs from renegotiated trade deals and penalties for factories that outsourced their work abroad.

A specialist in corporate turnarounds, Ross buys distressed or bankrupt companies at steep discounts, then seeks to shave costs and generate profits. Some of those cost reductions have come from altering pay and benefits for workers. Since 2000, his firm has invested in more than 178 companies.

Ross most prominently created four companies through mergers and acquisitions that focused on steel, textiles, autos and coal. In some cases, Ross has sold the companies he packaged to even larger globe-spanning companies. In 2005, he sold the International Steel Group, which included the former Bethlehem Steel, to the Indian steel magnate Lakshmi Mittal.

And while his investments appear to have proved generally lucrative, they have also at times brought troubling publicity.

In early 2006, the Sago coal mine owned by Ross exploded, triggering a collapse that killed a dozen miners. Federal safety inspectors in 2005 had cited the West Virginia mine with 208 violations.

Ross said afterward that he knew about the safety violations but that the mine’s management had assured him that it was a “safe situation.”

“Oh, my God, it’s the worst week of my entire life,” Ross told ABC News days after the collapse.

If confirmed by the Senate as Commerce secretary, Ross would oversee nearly 47,000 employees and a budget of roughly $8 billion.

Among its responsibilities, the cabinet department provides data on the economy through the Census Bureau and monitors the environment through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

One former Commerce secretary, Donald Evans, noted that a prime responsibility is opening up markets around the world for U.S. companies and workers.

“What you are is ambassador to the world from America,” said Evans, who served under President George W. Bush. “It’s critically important when you go to other countries that, first and foremost, you care about them, the citizens of their country.”

That advice clashes somewhat with the promises made by Trump, who campaigned on the doctrine of putting “America first.” The president-elect told voters that Mexico, China and other countries had played U.S. trade negotiators for fools.

“Under a Trump administration, no American citizen will ever again feel that their needs come second to the citizens of foreign countries,” Trump said in April.

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(Source:fortune.com)
Photo: European Pressphoto Agency

 

 

 

Russia wants to improve US relations

Russia hopes to resume dialogue and bring relations with the US “back to a constructive course,” according to Kremlin spokesman Dmitri Peskov, who said it would be “hard to make them worse.”

Asked by journalists about the Kremlin’s links with the US, Peskov said: “I’d like to remind you of President Putin’s words, numerous times he has talked about his wish to build good, mutually beneficial relations based on mutual respect and equality.”

“The President always said he expected a reciprocity from Washington,” Peskov added.”Now we know that our bilateral relations are at the bottom so it’s hard to make them worse, but we certainly hope for resuming a dialogue and we’ll start a difficult and slow process of bringing the relations back to a constructive course.

“Improving US ties with Russia was a key plank of US President-elect Donald Trump’s foreign policy during the election campaign.

Many in Russia had expected Hillary Clinton, who has been consistently critical of the Kremlin and is deeply unpopular in Moscow as a result, to sweep to victory on November 8.

Following Trump’s win, there are hopes of a fresh start though Trump told the New York Times this week that he was not looking to “reset” US-Russia relations.

Asked about Trump’s comments, Peskov referred to Clinton’s previous ill-fated attempt to “reset” relations while serving as Secretary of State.

“As for a reset, we can only agree with the President-elect because this word has embarrassed itself as the consequences of that reset are not the ones we’d like to see,” Peskov said.

“The term doesn’t matter. It’s about a will and showing the readiness for normalizing the relations — these are the most important things.”

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Donald Trump: First 100 Days Executive Priorities

President-elect Donald Trump released a recorded video message to the nation Monday evening, in which he outlined several executive actions he plans to take on his first day in office.

“I am going to issue our notification of intent to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership,” Trump began, vowing to withdraw from the trade agreement with 11 other countries that was pushed by President Barack Obama. Trump said he will instead negotiate bilateral trade deals that “bring jobs and industry” back to the country.

Trump also promised to “cancel job-killing restrictions on the production of American energy — including shale energy and clean coal,” though he did not specify which restrictions he planned to eliminate. This step would create “many millions of high-paying jobs,” he said.

Trump vowed to “formulate a rule which says that for every one new regulation, two old regulations must be eliminated,” repeating a proposal he made near the end of the election.

Notably absent from Trump’s announcement: His campaign promise to build a wall along America’s southern border with Mexico. He did say, however, that he would “direct the Department of Labor to investigate all abuses of visa programs that undercut the American worker.”

Trump also promised to instruct the Pentagon and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to “develop a comprehensive plan to protect America’s vital infrastructure from cyberattacks, and all other form of attacks.”

Trump said he would impose a five-year ban on government officials becoming lobbyists, and a lifetime ban for lobbying on behalf of foreign governments. He made no mention of his previous proposal to introduce term limits for members of Congress.

Trump also made no mention of the Affordable Care Act, after repeatedly vowing to repeal and replace it. In a recent interview with The Wall Street Journal, the president-elect said he was considering retaining portions of the law.

Also missing: Any calls to Congress to take action on Trump’s policies. Trump’s team has been in touch with the offices of House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell legislative priorities, but he made no mention of either congressional leader.

Trump said he would “provide more updates in the coming days.”

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(Source:politico.com)
Photo: Transition 2017 Youtube Channel/Printscreen

Donald Trump’s Cabinet Picks Still Not Entirely Known

By his own account, President-elect Donald Trump has worked out a few agreements after a parade of weekend visitors who could land major appointments in his administration.

By his own account, President-elect Donald Trump has worked out a few agreements after a parade of weekend visitors who could land major appointments in his administration.

There were hints but no decisions to announce. Mitt Romney, the Republican nominee in 2012, was “under active and serious consideration” for secretary of state, Vice President-elect Mike Pence said. Trump himself said retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis was an “impressive” prospect for defense secretary.

“We’ve made a couple of deals,” Trump told reporters at his Bedminster, N.J., golf club before returning to New York. He gave assurances that “incredible meetings” would be bringing “incredible people” into the government. “You’ll be hearing about them soon.”

More meetings are on Trump’s Monday schedule. His transition team said former Texas governor and GOP presidential rival Rick Perry was expected to meet with Trump on Monday.

Among the visitors to the white-pillared clubhouse Sunday were Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, billionaire investor Wilbur Ross, and retired Marine Gen. John Kelly, the former commander of U.S. Southern Command.

The businessman who is now the president-elect also apparently was considering options to lead the Commerce Department, meeting with Ross. “Time will tell,” Ross told reporters when asked if he wanted a post.

It was hard to tell if some of the visitors were on the job hunt. Hollywood powerbroker Ari Emanuel and BET founder Robert Johnson came through over the weekend as did health care billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong. Trump made a show of each guest, greeting them formally at the door, shaking hands, and smiling for the cameras and telling the press how “great” they were.

“King of Hollywood,” Trump said, as he ushered Emanuel in the door Sunday.

Between conversations, Trump revealed he was making transition plans for his family. He told reporters that his wife, Melania, and their 10-year-old son, Barron, would move to Washington when the school year ends.

Trump also turned to Twitter to share some of his thinking. In between criticism of Saturday Night Live, the hit musical “Hamilton,” and retiring Democratic leader Harry Reid, he wrote that, “General James ‘Mad Dog’ Mattis, who is being considered for secretary of defense, was very impressive yesterday. A true General’s General!”

The comments were indications that Trump is looking outside his immediate circle as he works toward rounding out his foreign policy and national security teams. On Friday, he named a loyalist, retired Gen. Michael Flynn, as his national security adviser.

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential contender, and Trump exchanged bitter insults during the campaign, and Mattis has not been considered a Trump confidante. The appointment of more establishment figures could offer some reassurance to lawmakers and others concerned about Trump’s hard-line positions on immigration and national security and his lack of foreign policy experience.

Trump told reporters Sunday that one of his most loyal and public allies, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, was also a prospect for secretary of state “and other things.” Giuliani at one point had been considered for attorney general, but Trump gave that job to Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama.

But even as Trump and his team discussed pressing issues facing the country and how to staff the incoming administration, the president-elect’s Twitter feed suggested other issues too were on his mind.

His targets Sunday included Sen. Reid. Trump tweeted that incoming Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, another media-savvy New Yorker, was “far smarter” than Reid and “has the ability to get things done.”

Trump also complained that Saturday Night Live, which thrives on making fun of politicians, is “biased” and not funny. The night before, actor Alec Baldwin portrayed Trump as Googling: “What is ISIS?”

Trump also insisted again that the cast and producers of “Hamilton” should apologize after the lead actor addressed Pence from the stage Friday night, telling the vice president-elect that “diverse America” was “alarmed and anxious.” Pence said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” that he wasn’t offended.

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(Source:fortune.com)
Photo:NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Barack Obama Ready to Speak Up if Donald Trump ‘Threatens Core Values’

US President Barack Obama has indicated he could break with tradition and speak out against Donald Trump when the businessman succeeds him.

Trump is set to become the 45th US president in January when he takes over from Obama, who has served two terms. Outgoing US presidents traditionally step back from public life and avoid commenting on their successor’s presidency.

The Republican president-elect has alarmed some US citizens with his choices for key cabinet positions, including Stephen Bannon, the former head of alt-right site Breitbart News whom Trump has appointed as his chief strategist.

Obama’s predecessor, George W Bush, has largely retired from public life since the current president succeeded him in 2008. Bush told CNN in 2013 that Obama had a “hard job” and “a former president doesn’t need to make it any harder”.

The current president said that he would extend the same professional courtesy offered him by Bush to Trump. Obama also added that he thought that the responsibility of being president would mean Trump would water down some of his controversial campaign promises.

The Republican made numerous outlandish pledges during his presidential campaign, including a temporary ban on Muslims entering the US and building a border wall with Mexico, which the latter would be expected to pay for.

Trump has held a series of interviews with potential candidates for positions on his team over the weekend at his golf resort in New Jersey. The president-elect is reportedly considering former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who was defeated by Obama in the 2012 election, for the role of secretary of state, and retired general James Mattis, who headed up US military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2010 to 2013, as his possible defense secretary.

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(Source:newsweek.com)
Photo: Getty