Donald Trump’s Day 1 To-Do List

On the morning of Jan. 21, 2017, his first full day in office, President Donald J. Trump will take a minute to settle behind the 19th-century Resolute desk, first used in the Oval Office by John F. Kennedy.

Then he will get very busy — if he follows through on his campaign promises for what he will do on his first day in office.

On Day 1, Mr. Trump has promised, he will redirect immigration enforcement, alter trade relations with China and other nations, relax restrictions on energy production, impose new rules on lobbyists, halt efforts to combat global warming, lift curbs on guns, push for congressional term limits and demand a new strategy for defeating the Islamic State. He may face some legal and procedural hurdles, but most of his Day 1 pledges involve issuing presidential directives, executive orders or memorandums that do not need legislative approval.

Although Mr. Trump and his top advisers have appeared to moderate some of his broader campaign pledges — they have suggested he might keep parts of the Affordable Care Act, delay building a wall along the border with Mexico and not appoint a special prosecutor to investigate Hillary Clinton’s emails — Mr. Trump has said nothing to indicate that he will not make good on his explicit Day 1 promises, many of which he delivered in his “Contract With the American Voter” during a speech in late October in Gettysburg, Pa.

Moving quickly is, after all, a modern presidential tradition. On his first day in office, President Obama imposed lobbying rules, closed secret interrogation facilities, banned torture and ordered the prison at Guantánamo Bay closed (an order that Congress has blocked to this day). Bowing to conservatives, on his first day, President George W. Bush ended funding of overseas clinics that provided abortion services.

Here is what Mr. Trump has said he will do:

Immigration

Nowhere has Mr. Trump been more specific than in his desire to deal with immigration on his first day. During a campaign rally on Aug. 31 in Phoenix, he told the crowd that he would instruct his administration to begin deporting illegal immigrants with criminal records immediately.

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An undocumented immigrant boarding an Immigration and Customs Enforcement jet in Mesa, Ariz., before being deported, Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

“We will begin moving them out, Day 1,” he said. “My first hour in office, those people are gone.”

In fact, immigration enforcement agents at the Department of Homeland Security are already under a mandate from Mr. Obama to deport criminals. The executive actions the president took in late 2014 order officials to focus on deporting “national security threats, convicted felons, gang members and illegal entrants apprehended at the border.”

But Mr. Trump does have wide latitude to direct an even more aggressive deportation effort, and he appears determined to do so quickly. He has said he will immediately end Mr. Obama’s program that protects undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as young children. But it is unclear whether Mr. Trump will seek to quickly deport the 700,000 or so people who signed up for the program, or merely refuse to accept new applicants.

He has said he also plans on Day 1 to suspend immigration from “terror-prone” countries, and to impose “extreme vetting” on others. And he has said he will immediately inform sanctuary cities — about two dozen American cities where officials have pledged not to prosecute people solely for being undocumented — that they will lose federal funding.

Economy and Trade

Much of Mr. Trump’s campaign was built on a promise to help struggling American workers who are frustrated by the loss of jobs, especially in the heartland.

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A brokerage house in Shanghai day after the election, President-elect Trump promised to tell his Treasury secretary to label china a currency manipulator, Photo: Aly Song/Reuters

The president-elect has said he intends to take several actions to pursue those policies on his first day, including announcing his intention to renegotiate or withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement and to stop pursuing adoption of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Both actions are well within Mr. Trump’s powers as president.

He has promised to pick up the phone and order his Treasury secretary to label China a currency manipulator, and to tell his commerce secretary to begin identifying foreign trade abuses.

He has also said he will call chief executives of major companies who have announced plans to move jobs overseas to warn them that he will impose 35 percent tariffs if they proceed. That promise may be difficult to keep: Tariffs require congressional approval, and the Constitution bans the imposition of taxes or tariffs specifically aimed at a single company.

The Environment

The president-elect has taken direct aim at Mr. Obama’s actions on the environment and climate.

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Gascoyne, N.D., where pipes for the planned Keystone XL pipeline were stored in 2014. President Obama rejected construction of the pipeline, but President-elect Trump has said he will approve it, Photo: Andrew Cullen/Reuters

Mr. Trump has said that on his first day in office, he will lift Obama-era rules that restrict where oil drilling and other energy production are done, although Mr. Trump may find it harder to change those plans than he thinks. In July, for example, Mr. Obama’s administration issued regulations making it harder to drill for oil in the Arctic by requiring extensive plans for containing spills. Undoing final regulations like the Arctic drilling rules would require a long legal process.

It may be easier to reconsider Mr. Obama’s ruling against construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which would bring petroleum from Canada’s oil sands to Gulf Coast refineries. Mr. Trump has said he will indicate on his first day his desire to approve the pipeline. And he has promised to call United Nations officials the same day to inform them he is canceling United States’ financial commitments to United Nations climate change programs.

Other Day 1 Promises

At some point that day, Mr. Trump has said, he will convene a meeting of senior Pentagon officials to discuss the threat posed by the Islamic State and other terrorist groups. “I am also going to convene my top generals and give them a simple instruction: They will have 30 days to submit to the Oval Office a plan for defeating ISIS,” as the Islamic State is also known, Mr. Trump said in Greenville, N.C., during the campaign.

The president-elect has also promised to act to get rid of gun-free zones around schools and other facilities, a nod to Second Amendment supporters. “My first day, it gets signed, O.K.?” he said at a January rally. “My first day. There’s no more gun-free zones.”

But that may be a tough promise to keep. Gun-free zones are a result of a 1990 law proposed by Joseph R. Biden Jr., then a senator, and ending them would require legislation that Congress is unlikely to pass on Mr. Trump’s first day in office.

It will be easier to make good on his promises to attack corruption in Washington. He has said he will propose term limits for members of Congress, impose restrictions on the creation of new regulations, and limit the lobbying activities of White House and congressional officials after they leave office.

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(Source:nytimes.com)
Photo:John Taggart/Bloomberg

Donald Trump, 45th President of the United States

Donald Trump, now the 45th president of the United States, promised that he would work tirelessly for every American and vowed to put “America first.”

“From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first. America first. Every decision, on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families,” Trump said in his roughly 16-minute inauguration speech, the shortest since President Jimmy Carter’s in 1977.

Trump told Americans, “This moment is your moment. It belongs to you. It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America.”

At times his speech echoed themes from his presidential campaign.

He pledged to give voice to “the forgotten men and women” and called for a return of power to the American people from the politicians in Washington.

“I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never let you down,” he said.

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Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts as Melania Trump and his family looks during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Photo: AP

He continued, “In America, we understand that a nation is only living as long as it is striving. We will no longer accept politicians who are all talk an no action, constantly complaining but never doing anything about it. The time for empty talk is over. Now arrives the hour of action.”

He did, however, present a bleak picture of the current state of American affairs.

“Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities, rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation. An education system flush with cash but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge. And the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential. This American carnage stops right here and stops right now,” he said.

Trump closed his speech with his oft-repeated campaign slogan.

“Together we will make America strong again. We will make America wealthy again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And, yes, together, we will make America great again,” he exclaimed.

After the inauguration ceremony, the Trumps escorted the Obamas to a waiting helicopter, which will take the former president and first lady to Joint Base Andrews, where they will take a plane to Palm Springs, California.

Trump then signed several documents, including the waiver allowing retired Marine Gen. James Mattis to serve in his Cabinet, while surrounded by his family and political leaders. From there, the group went to the Statuary Hall in the Capitol for a luncheon before the parade.

While making brief remarks at the end of the luncheon, Trump said he was “very, very honored” that Bill and Hillary Clinton attended the inauguration, prompting a standing ovation for the pair.

“I have a lot of respect for those two people. Thank you for being here,” he said.

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President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump walk along Pennsylvania Avenue with their son Barron Trump during the inaugural pared from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Photo: Reuters

The Trump family left the Capitol in a motorcade en route to the White House. They got out of the vehicle twice, walking for short stretches and waving to the crowds lining the street.

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(Source:abcnews.com)
Photo: AP

Trump: I’ll ‘work so hard’ as president

Donald Trump on Thursday promised change he said America hasn’t seen in decades, as he spoke in front of a crowd of thousands in Washington, D.C., on his final day as president-elect.

“I promise you that I will work so hard. We’re gonna get it turned around,” Trump told supporters, pledging to bring back American jobs, build up the military and strengthen the nation’s borders. “We’re going to do things that haven’t been done for our country for many, many decades. It’s going to change. I promise you. It’s going to change.”

Trump spoke for a little more than six minutes Thursday night at the Lincoln Memorial, echoing much of his campaign rhetoric: He hailed his campaign as a “movement” that’s never been seen before, recounted how it started in June 2015, rattled off estimates of the massive crowd sizes from his past rallies, reminded supporters that this is their movement and that he’s merely the messenger, and vowed to unify the country.

He thanked the performers at his “Make America Great Again” welcome celebration and his family for their support, and said his transition team had the idea to host a concert at the Lincoln Memorial, which he suggested may never have occurred before. In fact, President Barack Obama held his inauguration concert in 2009 at the Lincoln Memorial.

“So many people have poured into Washington, D.C. This started out tonight being a small little concert, and then we had the idea, ‘Maybe we’ll do it in front of the Lincoln Memorial,’” Trump said. “I don’t know if it’s ever been done before, but if it has, very seldom. And the people came by the thousands and the thousands, and here we are tonight, all the way back.”

Trump arrived at the Lincoln Memorial with much fanfare, drawing chants of “Trump!” from the thousands of supporters before The Frontmen of Country — Tim Rushlow, Larry Stewart and Richie McDonald — performed a medley of their greatest hits, including Trump’s campaign song, “God Bless the USA,” with Lee Greenwood.

Trump delivered his remarks at his welcome celebration, the final official event on the eve of his inauguration, shortly after 6 p.m. He seemed to enjoy himself, often rocking his head and swaying from side to side with the music. The concert featured country singer Toby Keith, rock band 3 Doors Down and actor Jon Voight, among others.

“This is some day,” Voight told the crowd. He cast Trump as America’s savior, the answer to all Americans’ prayers and the victor of a grueling slog of a campaign despite, he said, “a barrage of propaganda that left us all breathless with anticipation, not knowing if God could reverse all the negative lies against Mr. Trump, whose only desire was to make America great again.”

Voight added that Trump “certainly didn’t need this job” but contended that “God answered all of our prayers. Because here it is: We will be part of history. All of us. President Lincoln, who sits here with us, I’m sure is smiling, knowing America will be saved by an honest and good man who will work for all the people, no matter their creed or color.”

Trump and his family landed at Joint Base Andrews on Thursday afternoon on a Boeing 757, the president-elect’s first ride in a military aircraft. He spoke briefly inside the presidential ballroom of his new Washington hotel at what was billed as a leadership luncheon.

Trump arrived at the Lincoln Memorial with much fanfare, drawing chants of “Trump!” from the thousands of supporters before The Frontmen of Country — Tim Rushlow, Larry Stewart and Richie McDonald — performed a medley of their greatest hits, including Trump’s campaign song, “God Bless the USA,” with Lee Greenwood.

Trump delivered his remarks at his welcome celebration, the final official event on the eve of his inauguration, shortly after 6 p.m. He seemed to enjoy himself, often rocking his head and swaying from side to side with the music. The concert featured country singer Toby Keith, rock band 3 Doors Down and actor Jon Voight, among others.

“This is some day,” Voight told the crowd. He cast Trump as America’s savior, the answer to all Americans’ prayers and the victor of a grueling slog of a campaign despite, he said, “a barrage of propaganda that left us all breathless with anticipation, not knowing if God could reverse all the negative lies against Mr. Trump, whose only desire was to make America great again.”

Voight added that Trump “certainly didn’t need this job” but contended that “God answered all of our prayers. Because here it is: We will be part of history. All of us. President Lincoln, who sits here with us, I’m sure is smiling, knowing America will be saved by an honest and good man who will work for all the people, no matter their creed or color.”

Trump and his family landed at Joint Base Andrews on Thursday afternoon on a Boeing 757, the president-elect’s first ride in a military aircraft. He spoke briefly inside the presidential ballroom of his new Washington hotel at what was billed as a leadership luncheon.

Incoming White House press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters Thursday morning that Trump “continues to make edits and additions” to the speech, which he said will “be a very personal and sincere statement about his vision for the country” but will also include what it means to be American and what challenges the nation faces.

“I think it’s going to be less of an agenda and more of a philosophical document, a vision of where he sees the country, the proper role of government, the role of citizens,” Spicer said.

Trump shrugged off the forecast of showers that could literally rain on his parade — and his swearing-in, for that matter — at his welcome rally, telling supporters he’ll see them Friday rain or shine.

“I don’t care, frankly, if it’s going to be beautiful or if it’s gonna rain like crazy. Makes no difference to me,” he said. “I have a feeling it’s going to be beautiful. But I will see you tomorrow.”

With the backing of his supporters, Trump pledged to fulfill his campaign mantra and “Make America great again” — “and I’ll add, greater than ever before,” he told the crowd. He wrapped his remarks with a fitting description of what was to come, both as he exited the stage and as the political outsider takes over the federal government. “Thank you very much,” he said, “and enjoy the fireworks.”

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(Source:www.politico.com)
Photo:AP Photo/David J. Phillip